The Best Places in NYC to Watch Game of Thrones, Final Season

The Best Places in NYC to Watch Game of Thrones, Final Season

New Yorkers may be ready for spring in the city, but Winter is fast approaching – for the HBO series Game of Thrones, that is. The eighth and final season returns to the small screen on April 14th, and plenty of New Yorkers are looking to travel back to Westeros with their fellow fans.

 

Whether you just want to venture out for the premiere or make watching with friends a weekly habit, here are four spots to catch the show which offer special drinks, reserved watching areas, and all around revelry that would make the show’s original master of excess, Tyrion Lannister, proud.

Liquor Lab

If mixology is your thing, head to SoHo’s Liquor Lab and make like wine-swilling Queen Cersei. For the Game of Thrones premiere, the Lab has planned one of their signature hands-on cocktail creation experiences at the Game of Thrones cocktails and watch party, which includes teaching attendees how to mix up three show-inspired cocktails – The Rains of Castamere, North of the Wall and the Search for the Grey Lady. Pizza and snacks will also be served as you create.

 

Junoon

This Michelin-starred Indian restaurant has developed nine in-house Game of Thrones-themed cocktails over the years including the Jon Snow, said to be dark and mysterious, which arrives in a sea of spiced smoke, the Arya Stark, which appears innocent but comes with a kick, and the Mother of Dragons, which comes with its own citrus peel dragon head garnish. The bartender at Junoon, Hemant Pathak, will debut a 10th themed cocktail at the premiere — rumor has it, it’s dragon glass related.

 

Parklife

If you are really ready to be outside, show up at this self-described oasis in Brooklyn which has 4,000 square feet of outdoor space, drinks and food on April 14th at 7:30pm. Watch the Season 7 finale followed by the premiere under the stars at 9pm. Check back to see if the whole season will be screened, and enjoy your Game of Thrones drama in the outdoors as the weather warms up.

 

The Bedford

The night may be long and full of terrors in Westeros, but at The Bedford in Williamsburg you’ll find a rustic haven to watch the show every Sunday. The upscale pub, known for casual neighborhood dining, occupies a former garage. The restaurant has a carefully curated wine list, cocktails and a back dining room with a projector screen to make sure attendees can catch every minute of the final season.

 

No matter where you choose to catch Game of Thrones’s final season’s action, these venues make it possible to have a hand to hold and a shoulder to cry on, as well as a drink in hand. To paraphrase one of the show’s most infamous lines: if you think this has a happy ending, you haven’t been paying attention.

 

Looking for NYC activities with no series finale? Read our guides to the best live comedy, pub trivia, and free music in the five boroughs!

Coney Island’s Latest and Greatest

Coney Island’s Latest and Greatest

New York is always changing, and the Brooklyn getaway once known as “America’s Playground” is no exception. Once considered past its prime, Coney Island has recently transformed from a shadow of its former self to an entertainment destination worthy of its legendary name. As the springtime thaw warms up the city, many are likely to find themselves drawn back to NYC’s great beach escape. These are just a few of the exciting recently-established attractions that await them.

 

Coney Island Museum

This neighborhood is good for much more than a day at the beach. This museum, operated by the Coney Island USA nonprofit, houses artifacts of the old Coney Island and in their words, “defends the honor of American pop culture.” Here, Coney Island’s truly unique character shines through in collections and exhibitions that show off the creative character that has made this beachfront area a beacon for artists and sunbathers alike for over 100 years.

 

Ford Amphitheater at Coney Island Boardwalk

Nothing draws in visitors like a good show, and this cutting-edge venue, opened in 2016, has already brought in some star-studded attractions far from the clubs and theaters of Manhattan. With room for 5,000 fans and proximity to plenty of public transportation, it’s no wonder the Ford Amphitheatre has already carved out a place among the best music venues in NYC. The Beach Boys, Daddy Yankee, and Willie Nelson among many others, took the stage over the amphitheater’s first two summers to thrill thousands of fans, and this year’s slate is sure to keep the thrills coming for music lovers of all types.

 

Thunderbolt Roller Coaster

Anyone who knows anything about Coney Island is surely familiar with the famed Cyclone thrill ride, but some may not be aware of its once-great predecessor. The original wooden Thunderbolt, built in 1925 and dismantled in 2000, shares only a name with the new kid on the block: a modern steel coaster featuring all the loops, corkscrews, and dives that present-day riders love. Since it went up in 2014, the Thunderbolt has lent the Coney Island ‘skyline’ a reminder that the area’s prime years of amusement are not behind it.

 

Coney Island Brewery

Right in the shadow of MCU Park (home of the Brooklyn Cyclones) sits one of the city’s finest breweries. Their beers are on tap citywide but there’s no place like the source itself, especially on a hot summer day right off the boardwalk. Perennial beer lovers need not worry, for even during the cold Coney Island winters this destination is open for business. That means any time of the year is just fine for visitors to warm up with a pint or two at the Brewery.

 

The Best-Ever Theme Bars in New York City

The Best-Ever Theme Bars in New York City

New York is a mix of cultural influences and has seen the rise and fall of many creative eras. The best theme bars either retain an element of old New York and make it the focal point, or transport the bar hopper to another place entirely. Here are some of the best places for a night out on the town, though you might forget where you are.

Beauty Bar

231 East 14th St

Salons are a place for gossip, and so are bars, so the proprietors of this chain put the two concepts together for a successful bar/beauty parlor. For $10 the manicure and martini special is just that. Open since 1995, the bar has comedy nights and other shows. It is especially popular for women having bachelorette parties. Now with locations across the river in Brooklyn and across the US including San Francisco, Las Vegas, Chicago, Denver, and Dallas.

Reunion Surf Bar

357 West 44th St  

Named for the island Ile de la Réunion off the coast of Madagascar, the space is full of surf influence and island drinks. Christmas lights adorn the ceiling, pineapple slices adorn the drinks, and surfboards are posed as decoration in every nook. The owners include a musician and a former handyman, but both their business profiles start with their favorite surf breaks. The sister restaurant Playa Betty’s (320 Amsterdam Avenue) serves California style tacos and beach food.

Slaughtered Lamb Pub

182 West 4th St

A werewolf themed bar…spooky! Complete with a werewolf lounge and dungeon, this English style pub is named after the historic London pub of the same name where allegedly werewolves roamed.

Trailer Park Lounge & Grill

271 West 23rd St

The Trailer Park Lounge announces proudly that it was voted one of the top five kitschiest restaurants in America by the Food Network. It serves hamburgers, fries, and other staples of the American diet. Every wall is decorated with vintage items that would fit in not only in a trailer park but also in the 1950s. The burger & beer lunch special is just under $14.

The Rusty Knot

412 West St

Water surrounds New York City, so it’s only fitting to include a couple of maritime themed bars. Drinks on the limited menu are fit for a sailor, with a pickle back, dark & stormy, mai tai, singapore sling…you get the idea. Food is basic chips and tacos, because food is not the point.

The Ship

158 Lafayette St

A cocktail lounge with a different nautical theme, this space is all sleek metal and quiet booths made from sails, ideal for small groups. The menu includes chicken liver foie gras, homemade ricotta, and vegetable tartine. Drinks are sophisticated with one called the Bartender’s Choice, a surprise drink for those in the mood for adventure at sea.

The Way Station

683 Washington Ave

A Doctor Who themed bar and self-described “nerdvana.” The scene is complete with a blue TARDIS in the back and a small stage. Performances include musical guests and karaoke. Drinks include Sonic Screwdrivers named after various incarnations of the Doctor as well as other characters.

Gotham City Lounge

1293 Myrtle Ave

A comic book themed bar with a secretive lack of web presence. Their Twitter is the best way to find out about movie nights, discounts for voting, and other community events.

Otto’s Shrunken Head

538 East 14th St

This tiki bar points out on their website, “Manhattan is after all, an island.” They serve rum drinks and no food, except for the occasional BBQ or food contest. The signature drink comes in a custom tiki mug, and other beverages include a flaming bowl and a selection of drinks served in tiki glasses that can be taken home for an extra charge.

Burp Castle

41 East 7th St

A “temple of beer worship” and place for fans of Belgian and other beers to find unusual favorites. The tap list changes frequently and the best way to find out what is being served is to ask. Free pomme frites are served during happy hours. It’s a community environment, with meetings of the New York City Home Brewers Guild held here, but it’s not for parties. Bartenders are known for shushing the crowds to encourage more focus on the beer.

What to Watch Instead of Shakespeare in the Park

What to Watch Instead of Shakespeare in the Park

New York City’s Shakespeare in the Park is an annual (and massively popular) event at Central Park’s Public Theater, where two of Shakespeare’s classics are performed every summer. This year, the event made waves when the title character of Julius Caesar was portrayed in the likeness of President Trump, causing protests and the withdrawal of several corporate sponsors. Nonetheless, the event retained its notoriety, with tickets as difficult to come by as ever.

Julius Caesar closed on June 18, but A Midsummer’s Night Dream is hot on its tails. The second show premiered on July 11 and will run through August 13, but only the most determined will snag a seat. Luckily, New York City is a theater juggernaut. Those that know where to look will find dozens of other free, outdoor performances to fill the Shakespeare-shaped hole in their parks.

Theater at Bryant Park

On Thursdays around lunchtime, Bryant Park in Midtown Manhattan previews Broadway shows by bringing casts on stage to perform signature numbers. But if you’re in the mood for more than a sneak peek, Bryant Park also hosts complete performances during the summer, including Twelfth Night (July 28 to July 30) and The Tempest (August 25 to September 9).

Theater at Riverside Park

At the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park, The Hudson Warehouse reprises their 2013 production of the swashbuckling classic The The Three Musketeers through July 23. Starting July 27, they will perform Henry V, a dramatic Shakespearean gem.

Shakespeare in the Parking Lot

Why watch Shakespeare in the park when you can watch it in a parking lot in the Lower East Side? In the lot behind the Clemente Soto Velez Cultural and Educational Center, Shakespeare’s comedic All’s Well That Ends Well will run through July 22. Starting on July 27, Henry VI Part 3 will pick up and run through August 12.

Macbeth in South Brooklyn and Brooklyn Bridge Park

Want to watch one of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies, if not the greatest? Luckily, you have options. Macbeth will be performed by South Brooklyn Shakespeare from July 15 to August 5 at their outdoor venue in South Slope. At Battery Park in the Financial District, another rendition will begin on July 21 before moving to Brooklyn Bridge Park in its last week and concluding on August 7.

Hip to Hip Theater, All Around Town

Lastly, if you’d rather the show come to you, Hip to Hip Theater never performs in the same location twice. Henry VI Part 1 will tour through 12 different parks spanning every borough, plus some of New Jersey, from June 25 to August 20. Hip to Hip will also tour Shakespeare’s lesser known (and rather creepy) play Measure by Measure from July 26 to August 18.  

For the savvy theater nerd, there’s clearly no shortage of free shows this summer. Happy viewing!

Where to Find the Best Public Art in NYC

Where to Find the Best Public Art in NYC

New York City is an amazing place for art, artists and art lovers. Not just because of the amazing museums, but also because of the art that’s available every time someone walks out their front door.

So, where to find the best public art in New York City? The answer, everywhere! But, more specifically…

Start with the subway

From whimsical, curious political statues to tile mosaics that can be charming, informative (the actual name of the station!) or both, the subway is an underground gold mine of art.

Two of the best? First, get to the 14th St./Eighth Ave. station (the intersection of the A,C,E, and L lines) for Life Underground by artist Tom Otterness.

The permanent installation features a small bronze alligator eating a well-heeled, corrupt, politician. A woman reading a book sits on a similarly rich businessman.

The statuary is based, in part, on the work of 19th-century political cartoonist Thomas Nast. Otterness told the New York Daily News, in 2016, “I thought not that much has changed in 100 years.”

On the lighter side is the Subway Art Safari, a series of tile mosaics (along the N, Q and R train routes) depicting fun animal families.

Flocks of parrots fly over stairs at the Fifth Avenue and 59th Street stop. Penguins can be found by the exit stairs, also at 59th Street (Central Park South) and Fifth Avenue, as can a troop of monkeys. Not coincidentally, the Central Park Zoo is only a few blocks away from these entertaining images.

Above ground, there’s both a permanent and ever-changing landscape of art to explore.

Fearless Girl, by artist Kristen Visbal was unveiled in the Financial District in March, to both praise and skepticism. It put a distinct new spin on the art in that corner of New York (Broadway and Morris) because of the exact location—facing down the iconic Charging Bull statue. Fearless Girl is currently scheduled to stay in place only through 2018.

New Yorkers being who they are, someone recently put a Wonder Woman diadem on the statue, further reinforcing the strength of the piece.

Speaking of strength and iconic images, south of the Financial District at the tip of Manhattan is Battery Park. A trip there earns art lovers a view of perhaps the most iconic of all New York art, The Statue of Liberty.

Dedicated in 1886 and renovated in 2000, the statue is unique (to say the least) for both its meaning, and its colossal size.

Most recently, four Paparazzi Dogs have appeared in Greenwich Village. The work of Gillie and Marc, who are a husband and wife team, the demands-a-selfie art is on the traffic island at of Sixth Avenue, Greenwich Avenue, and Christopher Street.  

There is no end date set for the display.

For further proof that New Yorkers love art, head to the upper west side to see an original Banksys, lovingly preserved by the Zabar family.

That’s right, the founders of the family-owned for three generations market, Zabar’s, preserved a Banksy by putting plexiglass over it several years ago.

The piece, a boy taking a carnival-style hammer to a fire standpipe, is at 79th and Broadway. Incidentally (or not) that’s also the location of the market, which means there’s great food and drink options available to refuel for more public art touring.

Finally, keep an eye out for random acts of art.

Being New York, in addition to temporary and permanent installations, there’s also straight-up street art.

The blog worleygig.com features all things New York, but has a “street-art” tag that highlights the near-graffiti, colorful, often political, art that pops up on walls, posts and construction sites around the city.  

A recent post points out face relief sculptures by French street artist Gregos that adorn the facades of buildings and other random objects all along 14th Street.

Worley also keeps an eye on art that could easily fall prey to graffiti, refurbishment, or the elements. According to the blog, Nick Walker’s mural of his signature Love Vandal character in a parking lot at the southwest corner of 17th Street and 6th Avenue, painted in the fall of 2014, “still looks great!”

In short, there’s art around every corner in New York City, and you don’t need to pay for museum entry to see it. One might say the city in itself is a gallery, and given the scale of art it holds, we’re inclined to agree.

The Most Popular Dog Names in New York City (And Which Dogs Have Them)

The Most Popular Dog Names in New York City (And Which Dogs Have Them)

The dog owners of New York City have spoken and, once again, it is their opinion that Bella and Max are best names for their beloved pets.

This is, according to The New York Post, the second year in a row that Bella (“beautiful in Italian) and Max (often, in humans, short for “Maximilian” meaning “greatest”) top the list of popular canine names.

The Post gets its data from the Health Department’s dog license records each year. New York state law requires dog owners to license their dogs, and the city requires the tags be attached to the dog’s collar.

In 2016, according to the records, there were 1,358 Bellas and 1,268 Maxes.  The 868 Charlies, 872 Lolas and 867 Rockys completed the top-five-names list.  

In all, there were 87,031 dogs registered in 2016.

Of course, this being New York, every borough and neighborhood has its own idea about what pup names are best.

Once again, the Health Department is there to help with a map that shows the most popular name, based on neighborhood.

In the Upper West Side, Hudson and Theodore seem to be the thing. But just across Central Park Tiny and Nellie are the “It List” monikers.

Head for Harlem and the dog owners seem to want their pets to toughen up with names like Rocky and Boomer.

What’s even more fascinating is taking a look at popular breeds of dogs, and giving them the popular name.

According to the American Kennel Club, the French bulldog, described in this article as “adorable and squishy” has been the most popular breed in the city for three years.

Labrador retrievers were the second most popular, and was particularly beloved on the Upper West Side.

So, apparently, to be trendy, the best idea would be to adopt a French bulldog and name it Max, or Bella. Unless it’s an Upper West Side pooch, in which case a Lab named Hudson would be the way to go.

Or, like a truly independent New Yorker, folks could get a mutt at the shelter, name it Fluffy (which ranked 93rd overall in the city) and live in whichever neighborhood they chose, proudly walking their pet, daily, on the sidewalks they call home.