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The New Modern: Exploring MoMA’s Renovations

The New Modern: Exploring MoMA’s Renovations

When the Museum of Modern Art renovates, it doesn’t take half-measures. On October 21st, the museum officially reopened its doors to the public and — at long last — welcomed visitors into its expanded campus. 

The expansion adds 40,000 square feet to MoMA’s footprint and reportedly cost upwards of $450 million to complete. Today, the museum’s borders span the majority of the 53rd Street block between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. It was an admittedly tricky project to execute, as the architects needed to meld two sites — three floors of a residential tower on 53 West 53rd Street and an entirely new building at 45 West 53rd Street — into a cohesive whole with the museum’s original campus. It’s fair to say that MoMA met the challenge head-on, albeit with help; plans for the renovation were developed by the museum with assistance from the architectural firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro and in collaboration with Gensler. 

According to MoMA, the renovations served as a means to “rethink how we share art with you. We’ve reinstalled the entire collection to share exhilaratingly broad views of the art of our time in a way that is always evolving.” And it’s true — besides offering access to three floors of collection galleries and thousands of drawings, sculptures, video, and other artworks, some spaces within MoMA’s expanded campus also provide visitors opportunities to engage with art in a more personal and affecting way. 

In the new Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Studio, for instance, museum-goers experience live and experimental programming firsthand. As one writer for MoMA puts the matter, “Through new commissions, festivals, and residencies, as well as presentations of landmark works from the collection […] you can directly engage with artists and works in process and see pivotal and emerging works in dialogue.”

Similarly, the new Paula and James Crown Creativity Lab provides an experimental space where visitors can interact not only with MoMA’s art, but the artists who create it. Until August of 2020, the Lab will see a steady calendar of conversations and workshops that explore the environments and cultures that underpin artistic practice. 

MoMA’s new campus has been a long time in the making. The first phase of the project began in 2014 with renovations to the east wing; that same year, MoMA announced its intent to demolish the former American Folk Art Museum building and construct new gallery space atop its foundation. MoMA faced some blowback for the demolition, both from the former building’s architectural team (Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects) and supporters of the Folk Art Museum. The project pushed on; by the end of 2017, MoMA had completed the first phase of renovations on its east wing and began construction on the west. Now, after years of effort, the museum’s transformation has finally reached a stopping point. 

People seem to appreciate the change — for the new galleries, and for the unique architectural environment that encompasses them. As one writer describes for Fast Company: “The building is made up of a series of sharp angles and steel lines, but the galleries are woven into a series of seemingly infinite loops; the experience of viewing each exhibit felt more like an accidental discovery than something I could have ever intentionally charted. The building feels like a puzzle worth solving.”

In a way, the renovated building has itself become art — a tangible, thought-provoking, and walkable masterpiece that exudes the modern artistic spirit and curiosity. 

Want more insights into New York’s art and culture scene? Check our blog post on the Coolest Pop-up Museums in NYC!

You Don’t Want to Miss These Autumn Food & Wine Festivals in NYC

You Don’t Want to Miss These Autumn Food & Wine Festivals in NYC

Fall is on its way — which means that it’s time to break out the sweaters and scarves, get out the tasting glass, and prepare to experience some of the best food and wine festivals New York City has to offer. Don’t let your fall fly by without checking out one (or all!) of the city’s top-notch culinary experiences. Want to know what delicious extravaganzas are on your horizon? Check out the events listed below!

NYC Autumn Wine & Food Festival

When: October 10-13, 2019

Where: Locations vary per event

Price: $$-$$$

If you take food and fun seriously, this might be the festival for you. In its eleventh year, the Food Network & Cooking Channel New York City Wine & Food Festival (NYCWFF) offers food enthusiasts a chance to take part in a four-day extravaganza that explores the very best culinary experiences the city has to offer. It is the largest annual food festival in NYC, encompassing 500 chefs, over 200 sponsors and partners, and more than 50,000 attendees. The festival’s chefs pose a particular draw for attendees, as the event attracts some of the world’s most renowned chefs, culinary stars, and lifestyle experts. NYCWFF is as good for New York’s underserved communities as it is for the palate; since its establishment in 2008, the event has raised over $12.5 million for the Food Bank For New York City and No Kid Hungry.

If you choose to attend, prepare for a packed calendar — more than 80 events are scheduled to take place, including tastings, dinners with famous chefs, late-night parties, and culinary seminars. Tickets for specific events and days can be purchased online. NYCWFF also offers packages for weekend enjoyment and family-friendly ticket bundles. Note: attendance tends to be pricey, although the festival does offer some under-$100 deals.  

Brooklyn Crush Wine & Artisanal Food Festival: Fall Edition 

When: November 9, 1 PM – 10 PM

Where: Industry City, bldg. 2 The Landing; 220 36th Street

Price: $$

Experience classy foodie culture at its best at the Brooklyn Crush Wine & Artisanal Food Festival. Dubbed by Thrillist as one of the events “you absolutely have to do in NYC,” this fall food celebration offers festival-goers an expansive spread of wines, ciders, and hors d’oeuvres. Tables featuring top-tier light fare will be arranged throughout the Industrial City venue, allowing wine tasters to punctuate their sips with delicious craft cheeses, savory charcuteries, delicious international foods, and sweets. Upon admission, visitors will be given a custom-etched crystal tasting glass that they can use for sampling beverages during the event — and then take home as a souvenir! 

All vendors will be providing samples, and many will offer full-size bottles and cases for sale. Some food vendors will also be selling their products — so if you like something, you may be able to buy extra to share (or keep) at home!

General admission is $55 plus fees — although visitors should note that tickets are separated between two scheduling blocks. Attendees can sign up to explore the festival from either 2–5 PM or 7–10 PM. Early access tickets cost $120 and allow visitors an extra hour of attendance. All attendees must be 21 or older to participate in the event. 

OctFest: An International Beer, Music, and Food Festival

When: October 19, 3 PM – 11 PM

Where: Knockdown Center

Cost: $$

Want the best of New York’s music and food — in one place? Check out OctFest! A collaboration between the entertainment magazine Pitchfork and the forerunning beer culture website October, this festival merges all of the best parts of concert-going and beer tasting into a single extravaganza. This event will host two music stages and a spread of beer tasting opportunities that span over 50 breweries from across six continents. Entertainment for the event includes but is not limited to performances by Mogwai, Dungen, Duster, and Control Top. 

General admission will guarantee visitors a full 18 ounces of beer samples — however, attendees can purchase more samples or full-size servings if they prefer. Beer sampling hours will run from 3 PM to 8 PM. Buy early! Tickets bought online beforehand are $45 plus fees, while day-of-show tickets are $50 plus fees.

Harlem Harvest Festival

When: October 7, 11 AM – 4 PM

Where: St. Nicholas Avenue, between 117th and 118th Street

Price: $

Support local business — and enjoy good food and great entertainment while you’re at it! The Harlem Harvest Festival brings the country into the heart of Harlem by featuring food and lifestyle vendors from across the borough. Want to know who makes the best pies, cakes, cookies, and brownies in the neighborhood? The Festival will host a harvest bake-off to settle the matter once and for all — or, at least, until next year’s competition.

 

When you attend, bring your family! The festival’s Kid Zone offers kid-friendly programming such as a pumpkin art station, face painting, a Children’s Baking Corner with Legendary Master Baker, Mr. Lee, and a gardening activity hosted by Harlem Grown. Other entertainment offerings will include live performances from DJ Stormin’ Norman/Sundae Sermon, DJ Smithy Boy, La Orquesta Majica Latina, and others. 

This festival is free to attend — all you have to do is register! 

Want more fall fun? Check out our blog on Spooky Halloween Events in NYC!

Everything You Need to Know About Broadway Week 2019

Everything You Need to Know About Broadway Week 2019

Want to experience the best Broadway has to offer at a steal? Now, you have the opportunity to do just that — with Broadway Week. During Broadway Week, theater producers offer two-for-one tickets to some of the best shows of the season, including several Tony Award winners. Since its launch in 2011, the program has dispensed more than a million tickets to over 150 unique production titles. This year, the event falls in September and, contrary to what the name might suggest, will run for two weeks between September 3rd and the 16th. 

This event is clearly a winning deal for theater-going New Yorkers — but it’s a boon for those in the industry, as well. During the start of the fall season, theater attendance and sales typically begin to drop, slowing business for Broadway and, by extension, the restaurants and businesses in the surrounding area. To combat the downturn, the city’s marketing, tourism, and partnership branch, NYC & Company, bands together with the Broadway League to put on Broadway Week and counteract the downturn in business. The result? New Yorkers have a low-cost opportunity to enjoy a fantastic theatrical performance — and they can attend knowing that they are helping Broadway thrive during its slowest season. 

There are some caveats to the event. For instance, while the vast majority of shows participate in the promotion, certain hit plays may choose not to take part. Hamilton, for example, isn’t on the roster for cut-price tickets this year. Attendees will also need to buy at least two tickets to take advantage of the promotion. Each will be issued at 50% of its original price, plus applicable taxes and fees. 

That said, given that producers typically use Broadway Week to fill the seats that tend to be more difficult to sell — the mezzanines, balconies, side sections, etc. — those who purchase tickets through the program probably won’t be getting the best seats in the house. However, interested theater-goers do have the option to buy upgraded tickets. These passes will include seat options that are either closer to the stage or have a better view than those available in the general pool. Upgraded tickets are more expensive; purchasers will not only need to put in a flat $30 fee to access the higher-quality options but also pay 50% of the original starting price of the seat. This typically isn’t quite as much of a steal as the general pool tickets, given that upgraded seats tend to be more expensive from the get-go. 

But whatever seats or price tag you opt for, one point is for sure — you don’t want this opportunity to pass you by! Some crowd favorites such as The Lion King and Dear Evan Hansen are already entirely sold out. However, tickets to other great plays are still on the market, including those to 2019 Tony Award winners Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of the Temptations, Oklahoma!, and Tootsie. Passes for kid-friendly favorites like Aladdin, Frozen, and The Phantom of the Opera are also still available for purchase. 

You can browse and book tickets by visiting NYC Broadway Week’s event listing on NYC Go. In the meantime, here’s a list of all the shows you could be enjoying during this season’s promotion — don’t forget to check out special pre-theater menus at restaurants near Broadway before you go! Want tips on where to go before the show? Check out our blog on NYC’s Most Exclusive Restaurants!

2019 Season Shows:

Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of the Temptations

Aladdin

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical

Beetlejuice

Betrayal

The Book of Mormon

Chicago

Come from Away

Derren Brown: Secret

Frozen

The Great Society

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

The Height of the Storm

Mean Girls

Oklahoma!

The Phantom of the Opera

Sea Wall/A Life

Slave Play

The Sound Inside

Tootsie

Waitress

Wicked

4 Ice Cream Spots You Can’t Miss in NYC This Summer

4 Ice Cream Spots You Can’t Miss in NYC This Summer

Does anything symbolize summer fun quite as much as ice cream on a hot day? If you’re looking for a top-notch treat, check out one — or all, no judgement! — of these fan-favorite ice cream parlors in New York City. 

Morgenstern’s 

Location: 88 W Houston Street NY NY 10012
Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 12PM-11PM // Friday-Saturday: 12PM-12AM

Founded in 2014 by self-made restauranteur Nicholas Morganstern, Morganstern’s offers a classic ice cream experience. The ice cream parlor prides itself on serving texture-driven, small-batch ice creams that prioritize superb flavors and taste. Along with traditional standbys like chocolate chip cookie dough, cookies n’ cream, and mint chip, parlor favorites also include more unusual flavors such as green tea pistachio, salt and pepper pinenut, and burnt sage. The main star of the show is the ice cream, but don’t overlook Morgenstern’s other offerings! The parlor also serves pies, cakes, floats, and cocktails. 

La Newyorkina

Location: 240 Sullivan Street, New York, NY, 10012
Hours: Sunday-Thursday 11AM-9PM // Friday-Saturday 11AM-10PM

When Mexico-born Fany Gerson opened La Newyorkina in 2010, she had a single goal: to introduce New Yorkers to the sweet flavors of her childhood. Her store, La Newyorkina, serves a variety of Mexican sweet treats. Her most popular offering — and the one that first promoted Gerson’s shop to fame — are paletas; frozen treats that can be enjoyed on-the-go. These delights come in a variety of flavors — from creamy and fruity to sweet and spicy. Popular options include Mango Chile, Pineapple Jalapeno, Mango Chamoy, and Passionfruit. All are made by hand in small batches using all-natural ingredients. Don’t just stick with the paletas, though — La Newyorkina also offers delicious chamoyadas, cookies, pan dulce, and cakes. 

Republic of Booza

Location: 76 N. 4th Street, Brooklyn, NY, 11249
Hours: Sunday-Thursday 12PM-11PM // Friday-Saturday 12PM-12AM

Don’t feel bad if you’ve never heard of booza before — you won’t find it in stores. Booza, the precursor to our modern-day ice cream, was initially developed around 500 years ago in the Levant region of the Eastern Mediterranean. It’s a dense, smooth, and flavor-packed frozen dessert that sports a more stretchy consistency from what you might expect from ice cream. This change in texture stems from both its unique production process and two unusual ingredients: Sahlab (ground orchid root) and mastic (a resin). Traditionally, booza only came in a “candied cream” flavor; however, New York City’s Republic of Booza prides itself on bringing the dish into the modern era — and giving it a few tasty twists, of course. Flavors currently offered include chocolate, strawberry, horchata de chufa, French lavender, and sour cherry mahlab. 

OddFellows

Location: 175 Kent Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, 11249
Hours: Sunday-Thursday 12PM-10PM // Friday-Saturday 12PM-11PM

Want some quirkiness in your ice cream cone? Oddfellows has you covered. The now-four-location parlor prides itself on making the unusual delicious. The idea for the shop first came about when one of the co-founders, Mohan Kumar was attempting to find an ice cream flavor that would suit his wife Holiday’s eclectic pregnancy cravings. During that time, one of Kumar’s longtime friends and bar owner, Sam Mason, made Holiday a batch of homemade pretzel ice cream. She loved it — and promptly suggested they open an ice cream parlor. The Kumar’s twins were born 2012, and the first OddFellows Ice Cream parlor opened a year later. 

Today, Oddfellow’s flavor offerings range from delightfully classic to intriguingly original; their menu features highlights like burnt marshmallow, Thai iced tea, and toasted sesame Nutella along with standbys such as chocolate chunk. 

Want a few more insights on which dessert spots in NYC are top-notch? Check out our blog on The Most Instagrammable Dessert Spots in NYC!

 

What Are The Best Summer Water Attractions in NYC?

What Are The Best Summer Water Attractions in NYC?

Let’s face it: New York gets hot in the summer. On the brightest days, it can feel as though the heat from the concrete sidewalk might melt the rubber right off the soles of your shoes if you don’t find some shade, fast. But not to worry — there’s a solution to the heat that doesn’t require you to trade summer fun for air-conditioned purgatory. This season, cool down with one (or all) of these New York City waterfront activities:

Fishing on Pier 5

Need a moment of serenity in the city? Pick up a fishing rod and spend a peaceful morning fishing on the West Promenade of Pier 5! The pier has been arranged for your convenience; it offers bait prep tables and fish cleaning stations for all who visit. The view and ambiance are second to none — even if you don’t get any bites! However, if you do find a catch, take care in who you serve it to; currently, New York’s Waterbody Advisory warns that any fish caught in New York City waters could be harmful if eaten by pregnant women, women of childbearing age, and children under 15 years old. 

Public Pools

Relief from the summer heat is never far away in New York. The city maintains dozens of pools of all shapes, depths, and sizes for public use — the Bronx alone has nine swimming spots! Most of these public pools host free aquatics programs in addition to their open swim hours. Pack up your sunscreen and towel, but remember that you’ll need to leave food, glass bottles, electronic devices, and newspapers at home when you do. Floaties are also a no-go at the pool, so parents with young children should play at the shallow end when they visit. 

Future Attractions: The Squibb Park Pool!

While the Squibb Park Pool isn’t available to the public this year, it will be soon. When the Brooklyn Bridge pop-up pool debuted on Pier 2 in 2012, it was one of the park’s most popular seasonal attractions. In fact, it was so appreciated that advocates from local neighborhood groups ensured that it recurred for two years after its original end date. The pop-up pool closed for good in 2018, but work is underway to ensure that residents can enjoy a permanent public pool in Squibb Park within a few years — so keep a lookout! 

Boat Rentals in the Park

Central Park offers some of the most peaceful views in the city — and now, you can enjoy them from the water! Visitors to the park can rent rowboats and gondola rides at Loeb Boathouse from April until October. Rowboats cost $15 per hour, with a $4 charge for every additional 15 minutes. Professionally-crewed gondola rides can be purchased at $45 per half-hour. It’s a fantastic way to relax and enjoy summer in the park. 

Free Paddling

Why stay landlocked when you could explore the water? New York City’s countless water trails span over 160 square miles of ocean, rivers, bays, inlets, and creeks for residents to enjoy — and most of the time, you don’t even need to pay for the opportunity!

Downtown Boathouse

In Manhattan, the volunteer-run Downtown Boathouse offers paddlers the chance to enjoy no-charge, twenty-minute kayaking trips at their convenience. Their summer programming also includes free kayaking lessons on Wednesday nights and public, three-hour trips from Pier 96 on most weekday mornings. The Boathouse’s only major requirement is that paddlers must know how to swim and must sign a waiver before getting into a kayak. 

Long Island Community Boathouse

The Long Island Community Boathouse in Queens also offers free kayaking; however, the boathouse’s major appeal lies in its weekend programming. During the summers, volunteers run hour-long, one-way paddling adventures between Anable Basin and Hallets Cove. 

That said, New Yorkers’ paddling opportunities aren’t limited to boathouse-run trips. If you have a kayak of your own, you can set out from any one of the city’s 45 launch sites. However, if you choose to set out on your own, you must have a permit to do so and adhere to regulations set by NYC Parks. 

Want more ideas for summer fun? Check out our post on the 7 Best NYC Outdoor Brunches to Enjoy in Spring and Summer!