In a city of eight million, you’re never alone. But with ever-emerging technology, some apps aim to be the cure for New York City agoraphobia. Some are useful for avoiding the Big Apple swarms, whereas some provide a respite from social media overload. If you need a break from the New York minute(s), you should consider downloading these innovative apps.

1. Density

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At its core, Density is a sleek, savvy foot traffic detection system.

Density, more a black cube or block than an app, works when businesses attach it to their door frames. Density then uses infrared distance sensors that can detect when someone enters or exits. What’s great about Density is that it counts traffic, not identity, so those entering and exiting stay anonymous through the process.

The device, which is being sold to startup companies in great numbers, is already being used in California and is expected to roll out soon in other cities, including New York by the end of this summer.

The hope is that places like grocery stores, the DMV, and trendy bars will use the device, giving business and users a more accurate gauge of the numbers inside an establishment at any given time.

2. Anti-Social

In this era of tweeting, checking-in to every destination, and Facebook-posting every moment in your life, it can be hard to disconnect. The barrage of social media games, ads, posts, comments, and photos make for a crowded afternoon. In other words, our lives are physically and virtually crowded. That’s where Anti-Social comes in. Though not a crowd-ridding app, Anti-Social de-clutters us from too much social media. With the plugin, Anti-social allows you to set blocks of time where you can turn off notifications from your friends on social media sites for up to eight hours.

3. Avoid Humans

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Austin, Texas’ SXSW drew a crowd of nearly 90,000 last year. In response to those masses, an Austin ad agency rolled out Avoid Humans to help ease the anxiety of attendees. Though the app is currently Austin-specific, it should be offered to other cities soon. The app works to manage crowding in different categories like food, nightlife, and coffee with color-coded clever prompts of overcrowding danger: Green is good and Red means avoid at all costs.

4. Avoid The Shopping Crowds

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Many of the apps designed to avoid crowds were in response to holiday shopping; Avoid the Shopping Crowds is one such app. Designed to keep the noble holiday shopper from the swarms during the holidays, Avoid the Shopping Crowds partners with Facebook, Foursquare, and Twitter to monitor posts, check-ins and tweets. The app then monitors where all the people are converging, and updates users where not to be. Updates on the locations where you want to shop feature prompts like “calm”, “busy”, and “forget it”. The app is available in the Netherlands but similar apps are already developing in the U.S.

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5. Last but not least: Google.

Like Avoid the Shopping Crowds based in the Netherlands (but more robust), Google has introduced a live app that helps you avoid the bars, restaurants, and other businesses with lines around the corner (which are a lot of places on a Friday night in New York City).

Google’s unrivaled algorithms and live analyses are the main component of how the tech giant determines the numbers of people who are visiting the establishment you are interested in visiting. Piggy-backing off its Popular Times tool, which updates you on when a business is at its busiest, Google’s latest iteration determines how crowded the neighborhood is within the hour specified. The tool collects data based on a  business’s historically popular peak hours with stored info on Google’s servers.

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The monitoring tool can also find a similar business in proximity to your original pick for you to patronize instead.

In New York, there are a few things that people cling to: a stolen Indian summer day, a great pizza, and a little patch of peace and quiet. People who want to avoid crowds range from people who want to avoid getting run over on Black Friday to people who are just a bit shy and need to de-stress and disconnect. We live in an age and a city where every part of our lives involves interactions with our devices or other people. It’s not surprising that apps, plugins, and tools are popping up all over the world to solve the issue––and users are lining up to download them all.